Different Types of Muscle Strength Training

Based on muscle contraction, exercises to develop muscle contraction are divided into 3 categories, namely:

1. Isotonic Exercise

Isotonic Exercise


Isotonic exercise is an exercise pattern that follows the isotonic contraction rule, a contraction in which the working muscle shortens from its original length. In the shortening process, the velocity is not constant by bearing a load of magnitude not proportional to its strength. The microcurrent isotonic events occurring within the sarcomere are an actinic pull by repeated myosin heads from the triponin. One next ketroponin. The effects of repeated tugs result in shortening of sarcomeres. The response to the strength of isotonic contractions depends greatly on the magnitude of the burden on which they are charged. When the load is borne light or smaller than the maximum strength of the muscle, only a few fasciculus are at work, whereas when the load is heavier or as big as the maximum muscle strength, then the entire fasciculus of the muscle will be deployed.

2. Isometric Exercise

Isotonic Exercise


Isometric exercise is an exercise pattern that follows the rule of isometric contraction, a contraction in which the muscle does not change muscle length. In micro events occurring within the sacromere, the myosin head attracts the actin without transfer from one tropinin to another, or no sliding mechanism occurs. The effect of this mechanism on each sacromere does not change in length. The magnitude of the isometric contraction is highly dependent on the weight of the load. If the load is light or less than the maximum strength of the muscle then only a few fasciculus are at work, whereas when the load is heavily borne or as large as the maximum muscle strength, then the entire fasciculus of the muscle will be deployed. If we recall the arrangement of myosin and actin in the sacomere, the strength of contraction depends greatly on the number of myosin heads that may attract actin. And we remember that the number of myosin heads that are biased in pairs with actin is affected can be long sacromere (gyuton graph). On the basis of this theory the isometric exercise should be performed at the corners of the motion path.

3. Isokinetic Exercise

Isotonic Exercise


Isokinetic exercise is an exercise pattern that follows the isokinetic contraction rule, ie a contraction in which the muscle works at a constant velocity by bearing a load that is magnitude proportional to its strength.

To be able to do the exercises with an isokinetic model should have an exercise tool that can adjust the fickle loading. In other countries the tool called Mini Gym is used for exercises that can adjust the load according to the demands of the trajectory of motion. Modifications that can be made difficult to apply, if we do not have this tool. Isometric force exercises in every corner of the path are modifications similar to isokinetic, but this of course does not achieve the desired goal. Because isokinetic training requires muscles to work dynamically with constant speed.

Physiologically, the ultimate goal of the exercise is to "build up the energy sources needed by the muscles". Since the source of energy for muscle contraction is aerobic and anaerobic, then these two energy sources are built.

Greened from a physiological point of view, the basic principles of practice should be as follows:

1) The loading increases gradually

2) The principle of overloading

3) The pattern of load and motion pattern is the same as the actual load pattern and motion pattern.

To get a significant result. Strength training exercises should be performed 2-5 times a week. If someone wants to have a specific target with this exercise as well as exercise is done regularly. So the development of muscle strength does not stop before achieving maximum results.

Exercise can be done in the gym, at home or at other physical fitness gyms.